Hong Kong promotes Cheung Chau Island with a virtual tour

Hong Kong promotes Cheung Chau Island with a virtual tour

The small, dumb-bell-shaped island of Cheung Chau, or “long island”, is nearly 3 square kilometre in area and has numerous attractions for tourists.

Pak Tai Temple

Hong Kong promotes Cheung Chau Island with a virtual tour

The historic Taoist temple — one of the oldest in Hong Kong and also known as Yuk Hui Temple — lies to the north of the main village area.

The structure was originally built in 1783 by the island’s fishing community to honour Pak Tai or “King of the North” — their protector and patron deity.

The building includes a colourfully ornate ceramic-tiled roof with two green-and-gold dragons standing guard along the ridge.

The main square outside Pak Tai Temple hosts the Cheung Chau Jiao Festival or Cheung Chau Bun Festival.

The third national list of Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2011 features the hugely popular challenge to climb “bun towers” and claim as many buns as possible.

San Hing Street and Pak She Street

Hong Kong promotes Cheung Chau Island with a virtual tour

The influx of new, younger residents has given the San Hing and Pak She streets a makeover in recent years.

Hong Kong promotes Cheung Chau Island with a virtual tour

Tourists could explore handmade items created by local artists and trendy new cafes offering Instagrammable treats, including cold brew and homemade Earl Grey tea chiffon cakes.

There are also the red-stamped “lucky buns”, filled with different sweet pastes such as sesame, red bean or lotus seed. They are used during the island’s annual bun festival, but are also steamed and sold all year round.

North Lookout Pavilion and Pak Kok Tsui

Hong Kong promotes Cheung Chau Island with a virtual tour

North Lookout Pavilion is the island’s highest point where tourists can savour a panoramic view of the island’s tombolo formation — a perfect spot for Instagram enthusiasts.

On a clear day, tourists can look across at Lamma Island on one side, and Tsing Ma Bridge, connecting Lantau Island to Hong Kong’s urban areas on the other.

Hikers can head east to Pak Kok Tsui, a small peninsula with a small beach called Tung Wan Chai, which is a popular scenic spot.

Tung Wan and Kwun Yam Wan

Hong Kong promotes Cheung Chau Island with a virtual tour

The ‘handle’ of Cheung Chau’s dumb-bell shape is home to the ferry pier, the bustling commercial and residential area packed with alleyways of shops selling knick-knacks and locally designed accessories, cafes, bars and restaurants, and village houses.

Hong Kong promotes Cheung Chau Island with a virtual tour

The crescent-shaped stretch of the beach is called Tung Wan. The island’s water quality is good and people can see southern Hong Kong Island on a clear day.

At a coastal walkway below Warwick Hotel is a group of Bronze Age rock carvings — among a series discovered on sea-facing rocks on Hong Kong’s different outlying islands — a declared monument featuring stylised geometric patterns, some resembling human or monster forms.

Hong Kong promotes Cheung Chau Island with a virtual tour

Meanwhile, Kwun Yam Beach offers a windsurfing centre. This small, but popular beach attracts many water sport enthusiasts, including stand-up paddlers, kayakers and kite-surfers.

It is served by several beachfront bars and cafes where people can unwind as they watch the sea.

San Hing Praya Street and Pak She Praya Road

Hong Kong promotes Cheung Chau Island with a virtual tourThe two areas are home to many Cantonese-style seafood restaurants, providing al fresco dining with sea views.

Diners can choose items from the menu, or even bring freshly caught seafood bought from the island’s fishmongers, and have it cooked to order.

There are also French, Thai and Indian restaurants, serving a wide range of savoury seafood delights.

source: nation

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